Tag Archives: literature

Book Selfie Challenge Days 3-5!

Day 3: Your favorite chapter book as a kid
Day 3: Your favorite chapter book as a kid

Day 3: Your favorite chapter book as a kid

I loved this book and still do. The Two Princesses of Bamarre by Gail Carson Levine is the story of two sisters, best friends but complete opposites.  When strong, courageous Meryl gets sick, Addie must go on a journey of mythical proportions to save her sister and herself.

Honorable mentions include:The Junie B. Jones series by Barbra Park, A Series of Unfortunate Events series by Lemony Snicket, the Artemis Fowl series by Eoin Colfer and Eragon by Christopher Paolini Continue reading Book Selfie Challenge Days 3-5!

Morning musings

I love to wear your clothes
and let us blend between the folds.

Sweat sweet on sleeves,
Sun seeps,
twisted threads weep.
A lazy haze abounds, freed.

Your skin flush with mine.
Cheeks pinked like wine
Left blushing, hot,
Soft hands on thighs.

Yours/mine/ours;
Borders swaddled in time.

I love to wear your clothes.

Where fabric ends,
Minds intertwine.

 

Don’t you forget about me!

Photo credit: Deb Maries
Photo credit: Deb Maries

Apologies for the brief hiatus! 

Went to see Les Miserables in Toronto yesterday with some lovely friends. Such an incredible show. So many strong performances with stand-outs being “On My Own,” “Bring Him Home,” “Red and Black” and “Lovely Ladies.” 

Well done to all. 

Getting some last-minute Christmas shopping done today, but there should be a blog post coming very soon! 

Stay safe out there!

xoxo 

 

Step away from the news: reading fiction fuels creativity

Last week, on a plane to Long Beach, California, JetBlue Airways stuck me in a middle seat between two professional-looking gentlemen.

Photo credit: Creative Commons
Photo credit: Creative Commons

After takeoff, I pulled out a book and tried to begin reading. But the intensity with which both gentlemen scrutinized their seat-back televisions immediately distracted me.

Leaning forward with nearly unblinking eyes, Tweedledee and Tweedledum  were happily enslaved by the news.

Now, watching these two Type-A shmucks engrossed in re-tellings of rape, murder, dirty money and dirtier politicians inspired something dangerous.

We need fiction.

We need fiction to relax. We need it to escape.

We need fiction to finally castrate our jack-ass boss and bring our favorite television characters together when it would never happen on the show.

Photo credit: Creative Commons
Photo credit: Creative Commons

We need things that haven’t happened to explain what’s happening now. Continue reading Step away from the news: reading fiction fuels creativity

Take a break and kick back! Check out these 5 great reads for rainy days

Whether your plans were cancelled or you’ve simply succumbed to lethargy, rainy days are a great time for reading!

From warm and fuzzy to thought provoking, these five reads will satisfy your rainy-day fix.

1. A Dog’s Purpose

 Written in 2010 by author W. Bruce Cameron, this short novel

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Photo credit: Creative Commons

follows several life cycles of the narrator where he/she lives through different dogs. Each dog’s life explores their relationships with other dogs, humans and more. The story tugs a tear or two as themes of obedience, unconditional love, companionship and survival work their way through the chapters. This is a great, quick read!

 

2. The Catcher in the Rye

Photo credit: Creative Commons
Photo credit: Creative Commons

This well-known book by J.D. Salinger has been influencing minds since 1951. A brutally-honest narrative from the mind of a societally-scorned teen, this tale takes readers through the struggles of impending adulthood. Older brother and student, Holden Caulfield, battles the “phonies” of the world as he searches for purpose and identity.

 

 

 

3. My Sister’s Keeper

Though you may be skeptical after seeing advertisements

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Photo credit: Creative Commons

for the 2009 film, this novel by Jodi Picoult surpasses it’s on-screen sibling. The narration revolves around the experiences of a family and those they encounter as one of two sisters petitions for medical emancipation from the family. If the petition is granted, she will not have to donate the kidney to her sister, Kate. Without the kidney Kate may, or may not, survive.  The story is as touching as it is heartbreaking with twists you definitely won’t see coming.

4. Tuesdays with Morrie

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Photo credit: Creative Commons

This memoir by Mitch Albom recounts his conversations with former sociology professor, Morrie Schwartz. Diagnosed with ALS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Schwartz has a short time to live before departing the physical world. Albom delivers their conversations alongside flashbacks from graduation and classroom experiences bringing the reader into the room with them. Themes of acceptance and understanding canvas the work, inviting the reader to consider issues beyond life itself and making this book a must-read.

5. The Thirteenth Tale

This page-turning novel by Diane Setterfield follows the ambitions of

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Photo credit: Creative Commons

Margaret Lea, a woman born and raised in a bookstore, looking to become a biographer. Lea is commissioned to detail the life of Vida Winter, a famous novelist in the story. When she leaves home to live with Winter, she finds herself in a web of missing persons, incest, confused identities, arson, murder and much more. Though this novel is a tad longer than those above, it will certainly keep you occupied as it’s nearly impossible to put down!

Enjoy these suggestions, and may all your rainy days be grand!

Vonnegut the muckraker: 5 ways Breakfast of Champions will make you question yourself

If you want to know what’s really going on in the world, listen to the writers. Not all of them, mind you, but pay close attention to the ones who dare to call bullshit on everyone– including themselves.

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Photo credit: Creative Commons

Kurt Vonnegut’s book Breakfast of Champions did just that.

And I liked it.

Vonnegut parades his exposé of human failure. He arouses forbidden questions. He is a provocateur.

Consider these 5 snippets from the text. Can you see yourself in them?

Continue reading Vonnegut the muckraker: 5 ways Breakfast of Champions will make you question yourself