Tag Archives: generation kill

Update: 30-Day Book Selfie Challenge

Day 7
Day 7

Day 7: Book with the best male lead- Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

Day 8
Day 8

Day 8: book with the best supporting characters- The Magicians by Lev Grossman

Favorites include: Alice, Janet and Eliot

Day 9
Day 9

Day 9: the book you would recommend to anyone, ever- Sextrology by Starsky and Cox

By far the best, and most accurate, astrological account I’ve ever read. Continue reading Update: 30-Day Book Selfie Challenge

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Babes, bombs and bullet holes: check out what I’ve been reading lately

I’ve had a lot of extra time to read lately, and I wanted to catch you all  up with some quick reviews of the texts I’ve finished.

The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson 

Photo credit: Creative Commons
Photo credit: Creative Commons

The second book in Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy, this fast-paced novel covers the exploits of Bloomkvist and Salander and their various compatriots as they attempt to uncover a horrendous human-trafficking scandal.

The pacing of this novel was far superior to The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.  Larsson spent the majority of Part One catching readers up with Salander in the aftermath of the Wennerström affair, placating them with some small conflicts in the beginning until the real bombs are dropped in the center and end sections.

Bombs? Absolutely. I won’t tell you when, but The Girl Who Played With Fire definitely reveals a huge shocker alongside the explanation of “All the Evil.”

This was my favorite of the Larsson trilogy. It was engaging, well-paced, vivid and, at points, shocking.

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson

Photo credit: Creative Commons
Photo credit: Creative Commons

The final installment of the Millennium Trilogy, regrettably, starts out slow. Finishing off the jaw-dropping cliffhanger from The Girl Who Played With Fire, this book spends too much of its first half stretching out details and dialogue that’s definitely not as interesting as the action and adventure of its predecessor.

However, once you make it to the end of Part Two a few new characters, and even some old favorites, return to make the story much more interesting. At points, it seemed like Larsson was struggling to round out the ending of book three by adding in Berger’s stalker scandal.

A common theme to all Larsson’s books is the empowerment and strength of women. Because of that over-arching archetype, Berger’s story fits, but it still feels forced.

Overall, the book did a decent job of wrapping up the trilogy, but it was clearly the weakest of the three.

Generation Kill by Evan Wright

Photo credit: Creative Commons
Photo credit: Creative Commons

This journalistic account of First Recon Marines written by former Rolling Stone journalist, Evan Wright, details the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Later adapted by HBO into a TV show, the account follows the 1st Reconnaissance Battalion from the view of Wright as he remained embedded with them for  two months.

The text is gritty, vivid, raunchy and haunting. Wright’s words transport the reader far from their comfort zone, challenging them to accept the truth behind the writing– a feat that should never be taken lightly.

Retelling instances of death, destruction, manipulation and ignorance, the book stays true to Lt. Nathaniel Fick’s words “Write this as you see it. I’m not here to stop you.”

The book is extremely well written, descriptive and unadulterated in its actuality.  There were several times when I had to put it down and take a break for a bit as the details can really weigh on you.

Read the book. Be prepared for some internal turmoil, but read it all the same.

I hope you enjoyed my mini reviews! Feel free to let me know how you feel in the comments below, and check out my profile on Goodreads! 

Write on!